You Should Read This – About Home Dialysis Treatment

Medical science has allowed human beings to lead longer lives than once was thought possible, and part of these advances is the implementation of at-home dialysis treatment. Given the prognosis of either chronic disease of a vital organ or total organ failure, survival was not imaginable. Now, dialysis allows those with major kidney malfunction to lead longer lives.

The questions that remain regarding at-home dialysis, however, are due, in part, to the unknowns surrounding how it works and what will become of not only the patient but also his/her family. As was the case with our ancestors, a lack of knowledge on a topic led to a creation of a mythology surrounding that which we didn’t know.

Here are five prevalent myths about at-home dialysis treatment and the information you need to actually know:

1. “Dialysis treatment of any kind is going to be painful.” You shouldn’t experience pain during your treatments, notify someone ASAP. There are some patients experience low blood pressure, which can cause nausea, vomiting, headaches, or cramps, but this is not the case for the majority of patients.

2. “Because of my treatments, I’ll always be stuck at home.” You can actually travel on dialysis, but it requires a little forethought planning. In that respect, perhaps the quick road-trips may be impacted. For those on home dialysis, you can work with your dialysis team (your doctors, caregiver, and possibly a social worker) to have supplies to be delivered ahead of your prospective travel so that you’ll meet them at your destination. Plus, a number of home dialysis machines come with a traveling case.

3. “I won’t be able to work anymore.” If there is one thing that dialysis does not aim to do is take away your independence. Yes, your life has changed in a major way, but unless you’ve been told that it poses a significant threat to your health, going to work or school is still a part of their lives.

4. “Dialysis costs too much, which means I can’t afford it.” Between aid from the state and federal governments and support from private health insurance, cost should not be the reason to be unable to afford your treatments. If, however, you are experiencing financial woes, there may be resources available to help.

5. “I’m no longer important enough to listen to because of this machine.” Dialysis patients, either going to a treatment center or maintaining treatment at home, may be hit by waves of emotion due to their new circumstances. Part of these emotions may include feeling as though they are not being listened to and that their input means nothing. As the patient, you are the most essential part of the process. Keep in mind that patients have a Bill of Rights that is in place to make sure patients are being heard while also having tenets regarding quality care and privacy.

At-home dialysis treatments, or dialysis as a whole, is not a death sentence. By virtue of the life-saving procedure, those whose lives would have been lost before now have a chance to still lead productive lives. By talking to your doctor and understanding what is involved in your treatment, you become an active part of your own well-being.

Smart Tips to Make Your Seniors Happy

As your senior loved ones age, they’re likely to feel a bit isolated. This is the time when you need to be with them and help them in any way you can. Your efforts will go a long way in keeping their health intact and making them happy. It will also assist your senior’s live-in caregivers do their job properly. Here’s a look at five simple ways to make your senior’s day.

Communicate
Make it a point to talk to your seniors regularly and address all their emotional needs. Many seniors tend to keep their feelings and emotions to themselves and do not want to be a burden on their families. If you notice any changes in their behavior, engage in a casual conversation with them and try to find out what’s troubling them.

As your seniors progress in age, their self-esteem may lower. At this stage, your attitude and behavior towards them can uplift their mood or add to their misery. Consider gifting your loved one a senior-friendly cell phone and teach them how to use social media and keep in touch with them.

Be Available
Give your seniors the assurance that you’ll always be just a phone call away. It is important that they know who to call if they suffer from any injury or any other condition. As a responsible adult and caring individual, you should learn how to provide first aid help in case of an emergency and teach your senior loved one what to do in a critical situation. This will reduce their stress and anxiety.

Provide Groceries
Leaving the house, going to the grocery store and shopping for groceries can be a tiresome experience for your seniors. You can help them by supplying their basic needs to their door, if you can. Also make sure to get them their medicine refills.

Online grocery shopping has made the lives easier of several shoppers all over the world. Whether or not your senior is tech savvy, it is best to teach you senior how to shop for groceries online. This will save you both the hassle.

Depression
Your senior may be going through a hard time due to the recent loss of someone close to them. This is made worse by a rapid decline in their mental and physical abilities. For these seniors, your senior loved one faces a high risk of depression. If your senior is refusing medication, be gentle and considerate with them. Help them with a few simple tasks to boost their confidence. You can consult a psychologist for this purpose.

Internet
Senior citizens often fall prey to a number of online scams- such as medical insurance and car insurance frauds. It is necessary to take out some time and explain to your senior loved one all the online scams that exist.

Find information brochures or any other documents you can to help them be aware of investment frauds, online identity theft and phishing scams. If your senior uses the computer regularly, make sure to keep them away from scams and malware. Install a trusted antivirus in their electronic gadgets and teach them how to use and update it.

You May Ask This Before – Is Aluminium Cookware Toxic To Your Health?

Cookware is for cooking, right? And as long as your food gets cooked, what does it matter whether you’ve used an iron pan or a scratched Teflon pan?

It might matter much more than you’ve believed. A growing body of research evidence appears to point to a strong link between aluminium accumulation in the body and Alzheimer’s disease – a disabling loss of mental ability that is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States and the 5th leading cause of death among those age 65 and older and also cause of disability and poor health. As per statistics in 2017, more than 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s, an approximately 5.3 million are age 65 and older and estimated 200,000 peoples are below age 65 and have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. Almost 2/3 of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women.

Is this cause for worry?

We believe it’s time to start taking precautions:

Rita Hayworth, not so long ago, made Alzheimer’s a household word. A disease that usually occurs at 50 and over, Alzheimer’s is characterized by severe forgetfulness initially, leading to a gradual waning of the ability for abstract thinking (including the ability to perform simple calculations, exercise judgement and solve everyday problems.) The person finally becomes severely disoriented to time, person and place. Post-mortems show the brain to be highly shrunken, the brain chambers to be abnormally dilated and a marked reduction in the number of brain cells.

To date, there is no sure care for Alzheimer’s. Nor do scientists agree on what causes it, though there are several theories, and research is going on apace to identify the culprits.

It was way back in the mid-1970s that researchers first noted higher-than-normal levels of aluminium in the brains of Alzheimer’s victims. The question raised by this discovery was whether this excess aluminium caused the Alzheimer’s or the aluminium accumulation was a result of the disease process.

It’s a big question. Aluminium, it turns out, is a major player in our lives. It’s the third most common element on earth.

Aluminium, like other materials is present in all our bodies, though there’s no evidence that it’s an essential mineral. We all consume aluminium every day. A small amount of that consumption is due to aluminium that occurs naturally in some foods. But most of our aluminium intake occurs because someone, somewhere, added that aluminium to our food, drink, water, medicine or cosmetics.

And in our kitchens, aluminium pots and pans are widely used in cooking: being cheaper, lighter and easily available, they are preferred by a majority of the population.

But the aluminium in your cookware doesn’t stay there. Aluminium is highly prone to pitting corrosion, a localized form of corrosion that occurs due to small impurities in the metal. Says Dr. K.R. Satyanarayan, Head of the department of metallurgy, College of Engineering, Pune, India, “Even anodized aluminium vessels, i.e. those coated with a protective oxide that increases corrosion resistance, are not completely safe: the protective layer wears off with time, and there is no obvious indication to a lay person that this has happened.”

The risk of corrosion increases when food is cooked in aluminium vessels over a long time, and over high temperature. The greatest amount of leaching (of aluminium into the food) occurs when acidic food is cooked in aluminium vessels or stored in them. Try the acid test at home and you’ll believe!

Try this at home: Want to see some dramatic evidence of the effect of acid foods on aluminium? Line a container with aluminium foil, place some leftover tomato sauce in it, cover with foil so it touches the food, and leave it in the refrigerator for a week or two. When you take it out, you will probably find holes in the foil where the aluminium has been dissolved by the salt and acid in the food.”

Nor is Teflon-coated (non-stick) cookware an automatically safer option. The coating is a layer of PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene), a polymeric material that is highly corrosion-resistant. But when the coating wears off, the underlying aluminium layer is exposed, and the pan becomes prone to all the effects of aluminium leaching.

What exactly are these effects? The Scientists have reported laboratory studies that have shown that aluminium binds to the body’s chemical energy, ATP (adenosine tri phosphate) and could thus interfere with the body’s energy storage system.

How Aluminium works? Dr. Theodore Kruck, Ph.D., member of a leading team of aluminium-investigating scientists at the University of Toronto, offers his explanation of how aluminium damages nerve cells in the brain, based on research he and his colleagues have conducted:

“All living cells must perform ‘house-keeping’ to maintain their normal functions. To do this, they read ‘recipes,’ which are stored in the DNA molecules of their chromosomes. When we extracted the active chromatin (the chemical that contains the DNA molecules in our cells) from the brain cells of Alzheimer’s patients, we found aluminium levels in the chromatin that were nine times the normal levels. We believe that this aluminium reacts with the chromatin and makes it ‘sticky,’ and this prevents the cell from maintaining itself. It’s as if someone put glue on some of the pages in the recipe book. If enough pages get stuck, the cell can’t get the information necessary for its maintenance and it will slowly die.”

Dr. Kruck says, “We have progressed to the point where we now have a smoking gun (aluminium) lying beside a dead body (the Alzheimer’s victim). Although we still can’t prove conclusively that the bullet came from that gun, we now believe there is very strong circumstantial evidence that aluminium is the murder weapon.” Let’s look at some of the evidence against the metallic defendant:

Aluminium’s Toxic Litany. Several independent lines of investigation have clearly established that aluminium can be highly toxic to our nervous system:

  • Animal experiments show that injections of aluminium into the brains of cats (animals often used in such experiments because of their tissue’s close resemblance to the human variety) will produce memory loss and other behaviours similar to Alzheimer’s. And the damage to the cat’s brain cells is in the same parts of the brain as in human victims of Alzheimer’s. Experiments with rabbits show similar results.
  • People with kidney failure, can develop “dialysis dementia” – a condition resembling the symptoms displayed by Alzheimer’s victims – when aluminium from the water used in the dialysis treatment accumulates in their brains.
  • Natives of certain regions in Guam and Japan (where there are high levels of aluminium in the soil and water) suffer from an increased frequency of neurological diseases in which their brains develop aluminium-containing lesions similar to those in Alzheimer’s victims.
  • The excess aluminium in the brains of Alzheimer’s victims isn’t found throughout the organ. The aluminium build-up is in the exact same brain cells that are physically damaged by the disease.

The only way to make a 100 per cent certain diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is to examine the brain after death to confirm the presence of nerve fibre “plaques” and “tangles” in the brain cells. Although aluminium occurs naturally in the brain, in Alzheimer’s-diseased brains aluminium levels are elevated where these plaques and tangles are found.Dr. Kruck and his colleagues feel that, while they are still far from having all the answers, the mounting evidence against aluminium justifies some recommendation.

How the risks from aluminium cookware may be minimized?

  • If an aluminium vessel is to be used for cooking, make sure it’s anodized aluminium – but not an old anodized vessel where the protective layer might have worn off.
  • Never use a high flame when cooking in aluminium. Aluminium is a soft metal; therefore higher temperatures cause greater leaching. The risk is less when water-based food is cooked, in which the temperature does not rise above the maximum of 100 degree C, than if dry cooking like roasting is done, when the temperature rises higher.
  • As far as possible use a wooden spoon to stir food being cooked in aluminium vessels; the abrasive action of metal spoons or forks will get the aluminium off the vessel and into your food.
  • Don’t cook acidic foods in aluminium – the risk of leaching multiplies greatly.
  • Salt also reacts with aluminium, so transfer cooked food into a stainless steel container before adding salt. (That goes for vinegar too).
  • Avoid boiling tea or coffee for long hours in aluminium kettles. American researchers have found 30 times the recommended WHO limits of aluminium in kettles in which water has been boiled for long periods.
  • Avoid storing cooked food in aluminium vessels or in aluminium foil, especially acidic food.
  • Avoid scouring soiled aluminium vessels with an abrasive sponge. Instead, use a soft sponge and warm soapy water. It is best to discard very badly burnt vessels.
  • As a better option consider cast-iron sizzler pans. Made out of an iron-zinc alloy, these pans retain heat and, like non-stick pans, require very little oil. They can be used instead of non-stick pans to make anything from omelettes to dosas. Also available are iron pans, which are ideal for making all kinds of foods. (The iron you may ingest from these pans will probably be beneficial to you, considering those who are iron-deficient).
  • If you have a malfunctioning kidney, you need to be particularly careful about aluminium ingestion: the kidney is one of the body’s prime mechanisms for controlling and guarding against overload of any metal.

Children, particularly infants, are similarly susceptible, because of their immature controlling mechanisms. Don’t go overboard with tinned milk powder which comes in aluminium containers.

We ‘humans’ have got the life a billion years ago. There have been five mass extinctions in earth’s history. We are living through the sixth. And now we too are running at a pace to end it all. This time it will be our fault.

The new discoveries and inventions have made our lifestyle full of convenience. But our bodies require work. Just like the sedentary water starts smelling, the sedentary lifestyle has given rise to many chronic diseases like the heart problems, diabetes and hypertension.

Today, the health researchers are suggesting that most of the chronic diseases that have appeared in man’s life are due to STRESS. From where it has come. It is the bi-product of our so-called modern lifestyle.

We are standing at the edge of cliff. Immediate actions are required to bring back the healthy days. We must incorporate exercise, balanced diet, sound sleep, and the most importantly happy and positive thoughts to our lifestyle to get rid of all health problems.

I believe “The opposite of great truth is also true.”

Day and Night, Work and Rest, Art and Science… they all looks opposite but my viewpoint is they compliment each other.

The more you relax, the more you active. Life is a balance between what we can and what we cannot. Learn to live between effort and surrender.

More Information About Independent Verses Residential Living

Senior apartments, independent living communities and assisted living facilities are classified under homes for the elderly, where services may include room, board, supervision and assistance in daily living, such as housekeeping.

Overall, the occupancy rate for senior housing facilities has been consistently growing during the past five years. In the second quarter of 2015, the average occupancy rate for both independent living facilities and assisted living facilities averaged 89.0%, according to the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing and Care Industry. Occupancy rates showed improvement in 2016 compared with previous years, suggesting that the recovery will remain stable.

Senior apartments are residencies that are legally restricted to seniors aged 55 and older, not required to be licensed and often have income restrictions. They are similar in design to “family” complexes, except they usually have elevators, interior halls, more common area, and only one and two bedroom plans.

Senior apartments do not have central kitchen facilities and generally do not provide meals to residents, but may offer community rooms, social activities and other amenities.

The physical building of an Independent Living facility is quite different then residential assisted living home. The available shared space depends upon the community. Most Independent Living communities include smaller kitchens or offer community meals in the dining area. The cost of the facility reflects on the space and its designated use.

There are different types of Independent living facilities but the most common types for seniors are: senior apartments, Low-income housing. Senior apartments are apartment complexes that are restricted by age, usually 55 plus. Some senior apartments are converted private cottages or converted apartment complexes. Most senior complexes are assembled or re-rebuilt from existing structures; handrails and pull cords are often built in as an additional value for seniors. Some senior apartments provide community services such as recreational programs, transportation services, and meals in a shared dining room.

Residential assisted living homes are perfect for seniors that need help with (ADL) the everyday activities of daily living. Assisted living homes provide a better quality care for their residents; because the nurse to resident ratio is substantially lower then a institutionalized facility.

The monthly cost of senior care communities can range anywhere from $7,000 and up, depending on the level of care. The cost of residential assisted living homes, also depend on the level of care and can range anywhere from $3,000 to $5,000.

Read This – Smart Tips To Keep Yourself Cold Free

Few things are as annoying as catching a common cold or the flu virus. You have a busy life, and the last thing you need is to be down and out because you are ill. Fortunately, with a few safety precautions in place, you can put your best foot forward to avoid these conditions. While you may not be able to prevent them affecting your health 100%, you can side-step many occurrences if you act wisely.

Here are four quick tips to help you keep yourself cold-free…

1. Wash Your Hands Regularly. First, you will want to ensure you wash your hands frequently throughout the day. For sure after each time you use the washroom as well as preferably after each time you have been in contact with public spaces such as shopping malls, grocery stores, or other high-traffic areas.

You will have likely touched something which makes it all the more likely you will then contract on of these bugs. By washing your hands, you will keep yourself germ-free.

Make sure you wash with a quality soap and lather long enough to kill any bacteria.

2. Avoid Face Contact. It is also a must you avoid face contact. Meaning, hands off! Don’t touch your face unless necessary and only after you have washed your hands. Putting hands that have been in contact with public areas into your mouth, near your eyes, or near your nose will provide an excellent way to transfer germs into these areas. These areas are where bacteria love to grow and multiply. Thus they will inevitably cause sickness to set in if you are vulnerable.

3. Fruit And Vegetable Overload. One dietary change you can make to help avoid becoming ill is to ensure you are eating a maximum dose of fresh fruits and vegetables each and every day. These foods are chock full of antioxidants and will help to strengthen your immune system, so should you come into contact with different viruses or bacteria, you can fend them off.

Focus on brightly colored fresh fruits and vegetables as these will have your highest overall vitamin C content.

4. Eat More Garlic. Finally, concentrate on eating more garlic. Garlic has been proven to help strengthen the immune system and keep you feeling stronger, so it is less likely you will become run down when you have this vegetable in your menu.

Add garlic to any food you are cooking – as often as you possibly can. In addition to boosting your immune system, it can also help you improve heart health as well.

Get these tips in line, and you can be sure you will not be taken down easily by the common cold or flu virus this year.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

The Reasons Why Is Diet And Lifestyle Can Reduce The Lower Back Risk

Lower back pain can be as a result of accidents and falls. But usually, the pain and issues attacking the lower back are from everyday activities that are done incorrectly. When you twist reaching for something or sit in the same position working on your computer for hours or even carry heavy things you could end up with lower back pain. Apart from the activities, what you eat may be contributing to the pain because there are foods that increase inflammation. Inflammation is one of the major causes of lower back pain so you may need to check your diet as well.

With this in mind, it is clear that you can easily reduce lower back risk by being more diet alert and making a few lifestyle changes. The dietary and lifestyle changes do not only reduce the risks but can also help in alleviating pain that already exists. It is always better to find natural ways of dealing with health issues before turning to medications to enjoy the relief.

Diet

Fresh vegetables and fruits make some of the best diet remedies to reduce risks of lower back pain. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are especially good anti-inflammatory food and can include cherries, beets, carrots, watermelon, sweet potatoes and berries, kale, broccoli and spinach. They are nutrient loaded and will reduce the pain. You can also consider spices and herbs like garlic, oregano, turmeric, rosemary, ginger, basil and cinnamon as they are rich in anti-inflammatory agents.

Plan a based diet that includes chia and flax seeds is also very good. You can combine with omega-3 from fish like sardines, tuna, herring and salmon among others. Other foods you should include in your diet to beat the pain are pecans, almonds, lean proteins and avocados.

Calcium and Vitamin D are also very important in reducing the risks of the lower back. This is because they maintain bone mass, but they should also be taken in moderation. Natural food sources of calcium include cheese, yoghurt and milk and leafy green vegetables.

Lifestyle

When it comes to lifestyle changes that can help you reduce lower back risks, there is so much you can do. Some of the easiest changes include:

• Modifying daily activities so they do not include heavy lifting

• Improving your posture, especially when sitting on your computer for long periods

• Creating an exercise program that is easy to follow

• Managing weight and losing the excess pounds so you do not end up straining the back too much

• Sleeping sideways to keep stress off your back or using supportive pillows where necessary

• Keeping stress levels down to avoid muscle tension that contributes to the pain

• Quitting smoking as it raises risks of persistent back pain, heart disease and even cancer

If you observe the right diet and make necessary changes to your everyday life, you will be sure to see tremendous changes with your back health. If the changes do not yield the expected results and the pain gets worse or persistent, then it could be time to see a doctor.

Watching your diet and keeping up with an active lifestyle is one of the best ways of keeping health issues at bay. Always try natural remedies before turning to medication.

Something You Should Know About Home Care for Bed Bound Patients

To witness a family member or loved one bed bound is an emotionally draining experience. To be unable to do much to help their suffering and to provide the best of care makes the feeling worse. This article strives to offer some solutions and understanding for the layperson caring for bed bound patients in the context of home care.

Bed bound patients face a variety of issues, from manpower support, mental illnesses like depression, basic cleanliness and hygiene, bed sores, to chronic diseases like hypertension. Of this list, manpower issues usually rank highest.

Most bed bound patients in Singapore stay at home and are looked after by family members. Over time, this can take an exhausting toll on family members and an understanding of home-based care will be of immense aid to family as well as patient.

Understand the Cause for becoming bed bound

A patient can become bed bound for a multitude of reasons. A fracture of the spine, paralysis and coma post trauma, surgery, head injury, end of life causes, old age and the commonly encountered cerebrovascular accident are all situations which can cause patients to become bed bound. Understanding the causes can help prevent the problem from happening in the first place, while adjusting the care for such patients will improve the quality of life for these patients.

Common problems

Nursing Issues

  • Ulcers or bedsores: Pressure ulcers and bed sores, if left unchecked, can cause serious complications over time.
  • Basic Hygiene and Cleanliness. Basic cleaning of patients, regular change of diapers, monitoring of bowel movements, are all important but physically very demanding.

Medical Issues

  • Muscle atrophy. After prolonged periods of inactivity, muscles eventually lose their strength and muscle weakness sets in, making it a vicious cycle. The bed bound patient becomes more bound to the bed with the passing of each day.
  • Frequent Infections: Due to the sitting / lying posture, the lungs cannot fully inflate with each breath and hence respiratory infections are common. Due to the long term use of diapers, the urinary tract becomes easily infected.
  • Mental Illnesses. It is common for patients who are bed bound to become depressed. Love, care and attention, frequent companionship and empathy will go a long way in treatment of these patients.
  • Insomnia. It is common for bed bound patients to have poor sleep.

General Issues due to lack of activity:

  • Bed bound patients usually report a loss of appetite, loss of interest in all things big and small, and a general decline amongst all functions.

Challenges for the Caregivers

Caring for a bed bound patient is challenging. With the passage of time, the daily grind of caring for the bed bound patient will take its toll on the caregiver.

Enforcing personal hygiene, administering the correct medications, serving proper foods, ensuring regular exercise, and providing companionship for bed bound patients are but the basic fundamentals required.

To go beyond the above, turning the bed bound patient every 2-4 hours to prevent bed sores round the clock, suctioning and cleaning the airway, feeding through tubes, dressing open skin sores and wounds, care for urinary catheters are all farther challenges faced by caregivers faced with patient who have complicated medical problems.

It is hence normal for a caregiver to feel overwhelmed at some stage, resulting in high levels of caregiver stress. Thus, the provision of manpower, simply an extra pair of hands, will make a big difference when it comes to home care.

Risks faced by bed bound patients

Common risks include:

  • Development of bed or pressure sores which worsen if left untreated.
  • Formation of blood clots in the veins of the lower limbs. If these clots break off and get lodged in the heart, lungs or brain, it can cause farther complications.
  • Muscle atrophy.
  • Frequent infections and complications from the general lack of activity.

As an aside, do note that bed sores rank highest where nursing care is deficient. It usually begins with a mild redness to the skin but if left unchecked, the bedsores will infiltrate deeper into the skin layers and can erode the skin all the way down to bone if left unchecked.

Do’s and Don’ts

  • Perform daily skin inspection to check for reddening of the skin, especially in bony areas like knees, hips, shoulders, ears, tailbone, and buttocks.
  • If a bed sore is identified, cushion it immediately and seek medical help if the skin is broken.
  • Keep skin clean and dry. Clean the skin with mild soap and water; pat dry.
  • Moist the skin: Use body lotion to keep the skin lubricated. Use powder to dry the folds of the skins, such as armpits and under the breast.
  • Bedding and linen should be changed daily. In case of bed wetting, change the wet sheets immediately.
  • Keep the patient hydrated.
  • Have a balanced diet: A healthy and nutritious diet is very important to boost the patient’s immunity. Keep a diary to record all meals taken.
  • Exercise the patient: To prevent muscle weakness, exercises should be done, keeping in perspective the patient’s condition. If the patient can walk a little, help him/her walk around as per convenience.
  • Massage: Deep massages can help prevent blood circulation-related complications. Light massages are ideal for painful muscles and prevention of bedsores.
  • Positioning: Reposition the patient every 2 hours. Never drag the patient; always lift.
  • Keep limbs elevated: Both hands and legs should be kept a little elevated to prevent swelling and help blood circulation.

What to do in case of bedsores?

Unless experienced or trained, the first contact of bedsores should be handled by medical professionals as far as possible.

However, for first response, the best treatment of bed sores is to leave it open to air and to alleviate any pressure on the bed sore as much as possible.

With enough experience with the type of dressings to be used, the caregiver should learn from each episode and become familiar with the available treatments and methods used to clean bed sores.

The best method of treatment bed sores is prevention. So constant vigilance is the key.